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Carl E. Person
225 E. 36th St. Suite 3A
New York NY 10016-3664
Tel. No. - 212-307-4444
Fax No. - 212-307-0247
Email Address: carlpers2@gmail.com

Convert Your Local Library into a "Country Club" for Residents

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In my ebook Dropping Out, I describe how a town's library should be augmented with certain features and then used as a country club for local residents. Summary of Dropping Out Ch. 8 - Library as Country Club.

The chapter summary states:

Ch. 8 - Free Library Is Your New Country Club

Living in the sticks does not have to be a bad thing, and in fact can be most desirable, for its ability to reduce the need for spending one's time earning money, which time reduces the amount of time available for other pursuits. I believe that the wave of the future for individuals (including myself) and for communities (in the sticks, particularly) is the development of various types of intellectual property. Don't be fooled by that term, it covers a lot of territory. For example, it would cover the compilation and protection (by trademark and copyright, perhaps even know-how and patent) of a list of persons who are interested in contributing money or services to create intellectual property centers around the United States. It also covers patents, trademarks, copyrights, protectable ideas, design patents, know-how, character licensing, movies, screenplays, treatments, movie ideas, books, manuscripts, book ideas, magazines, newspapers, data bases, applications software, graphics, other software, cartoons, designs, fabric designs, packaging designs, logos, and so on, the things which are running the world today.

You don't have to work in a city to develop, own or market intellectual property, and if you have more time on your hands because of a lower personal overhead, you can use your new home away from the city as your laboratory, study, library, office or workplace to develop anything you want. A few years ago I visited various libraries in New Jersey and tried to sell the librarians on setting up intellectual property centers for the community, which would provide a meeting place for residents and others to learn about the conception, development, protection and marketing of different types of intellectual property, would motivate members of the community to go into this higher-income type of economic activity, for their betterment as well as the community's; and to provide computers, software, assistance, research skills and various databases (including patent, copyright and trademark searches) to help intellectual property developers with their work.

Whether or not a community is developed along the lines discussed below, any community, large or small, but particularly a small community should create within the local library an intellectual property center for its residents. These centers alone could be worth the move from city life to non-city living. Cities are so large, costly and unmanageable that it is unlikely that cities could develop intellectual property centers conveniently located for all (even though there may be some centers miles away). Small towns can have a convenient center where people will get to know each other, join with each other and help and motivate each other. Cities cannot duplicate this part of my idea for intellectual property centers.

Email This Proposal to Gov't Officials, Chamber of Comm., Trade Assoc., Small Businesses, Other Interested Persons